Fruition

Presented/Guest
with special guest TK & The Holy Know-Nothings
The State Room's 11th Birthday Bash
Date
Wednesday, April 1, 2020
Time/Doors
Doors 7 | Show 8
POSTPONED
Facebook Event
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Description

Fruition’s newest album, Broken at the Break of Day, may be hard to categorize, yet it feels complete because of their dedication to honesty as well as harmony. Influenced equally by acoustic music and rock ‘n’ roll, the Portland, Oregon-based band is composed of Jay Cobb Anderson (electric guitar, vocals), Kellen Asebroek (piano, acoustic guitar vocals), Jeff Leonard (bass), Mimi Naja (mandolin, electric guitar, vocals) and Tyler Thompson (drums). Their unmistakable vocal blend first revealed itself in 2008 when Anderson tagged along with Asebroek and Naja for an afternoon of busking in Portland. Since that time, they have opened shows for the Wood Brothers, Greensky Bluegrass, and Jack Johnson, and at appeared at festivals like Telluride Bluegrass, Bonnaroo, and DelFest. Broken at the Break of Day follows the band’s exceptional 2019 album, Wild as the Night.

 

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TK & The Holy Know-Nothings

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TK & The Holy Know-Nothings was borne out of frontman Taylor Kingman’s desire to create a loose, groove-heavy bar band, but never at the expense of good, honest songwriting. To do so, he pulled together his dream lineup, consisting of drummer Tyler Thompson and multi-instrumentalists Jay Cobb Anderson (lead guitar, harmonica), Lewi Longmire (bass, guitar, pedal steel, flugelhorn) and Sydney Nash (keys, bass, slide guitar, cornet). It’s a band of deeply contrasting styles buoyed by a sincere and palpable mutual trust–one that allows them to find and lose the groove with the same ease. They build graceful, spaced-out landscapes around Kingman’s storytelling–his voice ragged and broken one moment and raging the next–only to deconstruct them through a fit of manic and often dissonant rabbit holes. They’ve created irreverent rock and roll where nothing is sacred because everything is sacred. Theirs is a sound lovingly dubbed “psychedelic doom boogie” with a groove that’s tempered and deepened by Kingman’s stubborn devotion to the unglorified truth of things.