Jamestown Revival

Presented/Guest
with special guest Desure
Date
Tuesday, March 17, 2020
Time/Doors
Doors 7 | Show 8

POSTPONED

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THIS SHOW HAS BEEN POSTPONED. A MESSAGE FROM THE BAND:

Dear Friends,

Due to the growing concerns involving everyone’s health surrounding the coronavirus (Covid-19), it is with deep regret we announce the need to postpone our remaining March tour dates (see dates below).  This decision does not come easy as we would never want to disappoint you. However, our concern for your health and safety is our number one priority, especially at this time. We are aiming to reschedule these shows at a later date so keep your tickets nearby and we’ll be sure to keep you posted. 

Meanwhile, as always, we deeply appreciate your support and understanding.  

Be well,

Jonathan & Zach

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Reflecting the majestic landscape where it was recorded, Jamestown Revival’s new album San Isabel feels calm- ing, spacious, and most of all, natural. Led by Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance, the band embraced a minimalist ap- proach for these 11 tracks, recorded in a remote cabin in central Colorado. Each workday began with coffee on the front porch and a mountainous view of the San Isabel National Forest.
“We were out there probably 17 days. Everything just slows down,” Chance says. “We’d go into town to get food in the evenings, just to break it up, but most days when we were recording we would have the doors and the windows open, and the breeze going through it. It’s a small cabin so it’s cozy.”

“It’s got so much character. You walk into this place and it gives you a really cool feeling,” Clay adds. “The spirit of that mountain range is all over this record.”
Following four years of relentless touring, Jamestown Revival essentially disappeared in 2018, spending almost every day together writing new material in their home base of Austin, Texas. Clay and Chance – who met as teenagers in the small town of Magnolia, Texas – set out to pursue their own musical vision, re-focusing on their roots.
“When we sat down to write this record, we asked our- selves, ‘What kind of record do we want to write?’” Clay recalls. “The first thing that came up in that conversation was, ‘Well, why did we even start Jamestown Revival in the first place?’ It was because we enjoyed singing harmonies so much. So we decided to write a record built around that. That’s what we started doing this for. It’s re- ally as simple as that. To us, harmonies are the third man. It’s what makes a song feel complete.”

Most of the time, Clay takes lead vocal with Chance on high harmony, a striking blend that appears effortless. Yet, San Isabel occasionally flips that concept as Clay’s expressive baritone drifts beneath Chance’s pristine tenor lead. “It’s not about who’s singing the loudest or who’s the getting the voice with the most recognition. It’s about blending these voices together so it makes the most impact,” Chance says. “I grew up playing basketball and baseball, and in my mind, harmony is a team sport and it’s a sum of all the parts.”

For the first time ever, Jamestown Revival enlisted a co-producer, Jamie Mefford (Nathaniel Rateliff, Gregory Alan Isakov). Finding inspiration in ‘60s and early 70’s folk and pop, the original songs on San Isabel show a reverence for early John Denver and Bob Dylan, as well as Simon & Garfunkel and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Nestled near the end of the album is a stunning reinter- pretation of the 1965 classic, “California Dreamin’.”
The low-key vibe of San Isabel harkens back to the duo’s first recording, Utah, a homemade project from 2014. After signing with a major label, the band expanded and re-released Utah, followed by 2016’s rock-oriented The Education of a Wandering Man. Building a fan base through grass roots support and AAA radio, Jamestown Revival has performed at iconic venues from the Ry- man Auditorium to Red Rocks Amphitheater as well as countless festivals such as Coachella, Austin City Limits, Stagecoach, Willie Nelson’s Fourth of July Picnic and more.

Chance says, “This record is different than our previ- ous two and it definitely has more of an ethereal thing. The heads and tails of the songs are longer, so it really is creating a trance. We love records that you can drive to, and hopefully this is one that you can take a road trip to. Jamie really helped bring that out. We would record and get the essentials, whether it be an acoustic guitar or an electric guitar. Then we would add what we started calling ‘celestial seasonings,’ where we would do these tracks with an ethereal vibe, which became an undercur- rent throughout the record.”

Indeed, listen closely to San Isabel and the sounds of songbirds, a booming tin roof, and even a package of flour tortillas (used as a snare drum) can be heard in the mix. A skilled woodworker, Clay also built a baritone lap steel guitar from a leftover piece of alder wood in order to capture a deep slide guitar groove. However, he didn’t get the instrument’s grounding quite right, meaning that Zach had to put one hand on the guitar jack and the other hand on his bandmate to eliminate the buzzing.
That obvious camaraderie is a big part of Jamestown Revival’s appeal. Clay and Chance have maintained a close friendship since they met at age 15, attending high school together in Magnolia, Texas. “People say they can see it and they can feel it,” Clay says. “I mean, we’ve been friends forever, it feels like. It’s a brotherhood. We don’t always like each other but we love each other, you know? We truly enjoy being able to do what we do, to make music and travel together.”

The band’s name evokes the beginnings of a new era by combining a reference to one of America’s first settlements (Jamestown, Virginia) with one of their favorite bands (Creedence Clearwater Revival). Now that San Isabel is complete, another revival is imminent.

“Especially when music is your job, if you’re not out playing shows and you don’t have these tangible things to show what you’re doing, it feels kind of intimidating,” Chance says. “But it is so essential to step away from that and reflect and to spend time working on it. Honing our craft is something I think we’ll always have to do, but in our humble little world, we have to chip away at it however we can. Stepping away like that is important to slow it down a little bit.”

Clay adds, “We wrote this record with sort of an overarching theme, which is cutting out the noise for a minute and maybe stepping away from social media, from the internet, and from the complicated, busy nature of most of our lives – and focusing on existing for a minute. If this record inspires people to do a little bit of that, then we would be really happy with that result.”

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Desure

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Straight shooters make a mark. They leave a lasting impression whose impact only grows over time. The picture might not always be pretty, but it remains powerful, nonetheless. Representing the missing link between sixties Laurel Canyon and desert dust bowl country right from the heart of Bakersfield, Desure traffics on his own road beset by unfiltered storytelling, evocative instrumentation, and soulful delivery.

Like candid dialogue befitting of a late-night cruise in the glow of headlights and nothing more, thebearded country-folk troubadour doesn’t censor a thing. As a result, he steadily maintains pace on an upward rise highlighted by syncs on NETFLIX’s The Ranch, sold out tours supporting Midland, and acclaim from the likes of Rolling Stone within a year since his emergence.

“To be honest, the music is a direct reflection of what I’m going through,” he affirms. “The songs are pretty literal. Everything I write comes from me. Music is therapy, straight up. I have to release it, or else I get in my head. It starts with a need to say what’s on my mind and what I’m feeling.”

Born and raised in the San Fernando Valley, he identified music’s power at a young age. A huge record player magnetically attracted Desure as he spun mom’s Rolling Stones and Beatles vinyl and dad’s Neil Young and Bob Dylan records. At the same time, he discovered hardcore and punk, attending underground shows with friends and becoming “hooked on the energy of people crowd surfing and singing along.” He picked up a guitar at twelve-years-old and learned by teaching himself Green Day. By 14, he performed regularly in high school bands. Two years later, he left his folks’ house and moved into his girlfriend’s Hollywood pad.

After “years of fucking around,” friends in Midland invited him to join them on the road as a tour manager. Relocating to Texas, he traversed the country with the boys and learned the ins and outs of the business. After opening for them last-minute at a show in Bakersfield, he hung up his management spurs and made a decision to “get serious about creating music again.”

In 2018, he unveiled his debut single “Stranded Son” and stirred up a growing buzz. In the aftermath of its release, Rolling Stone lauded him among “10 New Country Artists You Need to Know.” Between touring with Midland, the slick and swaggering send-off “Kick Rocks” followed as he continued to record the tracks that now comprise his 2019 debut EP. Blurring the lines between country, folk, indie, and rock, these six tracks formally introduce him. A clean lead and rustling acoustic guitar back his catchy confessional on the single “Los Angeles.” Rife with wailing slide guitar, a sunny spirit underscores the telling admission, “Los Angeles, you’re killing me. Lord, I can’t live on two hours sleep. With a daily dose put up my nose to the women we talk to after shows, it’s a simple reminder of what’s to come when I say I won’t—but wind up drunk.”

“It’s about me moving to Texas,” he explains. “During the time, I just needed to get the fuck out of L.A. My lifestyle was dangerous, because I was partying nonstop and not really doing shit. I didn’t have a care in the world. It’s therapeutic to tell this now. I wanted to finally do music like I was supposed to instead of just talking about it.”

On the EP, the nocturnal bliss of his cover of “Sailing Nights” by Bob Seger represents the cinematic side of his vocals with its robust piano and vivid production. Meanwhile, the stark acoustic “Stay Here A While” offers up a heartfelt ballad to his wife. “It’s a really important one,” he adds. “I just wanted to say thanks to her.”

By holding nothing back, Desure makes a mark of his own. “I hope people possibly feel inspired when they listen to me,” he leaves off. “If I can make one person feel this way, it’s beyond anything I could ever ask for. My songs are who I am. I’m giving you me.”